Saturday, April 30, 2011

2011 New Toyota Matrix Review


The 2011 Matrix is due a minor styling facelift and its sporty and all-wheel-drive (AWD) models will likely get a new engine. The 2011 Matrix will remain basically a station wagon version of the 2011 Toyota Corolla compact sedan but with the additional benefit of available AWD. Toyota is phasing-in the installation of an electronic brake override designed to thwart sudden acceleration and every model-year 2011 Matrix will have the upgrade. Most 2010 models should have it as well.


Wait for the 2011 Matrix if you want the latest styling tweaks or you’re interested in a bit more power. Neither should be compelling enough, however, to pass up a great deal on a 2010 Matrix if you need a compact wagon now. Toyota’s extending generous cash-back and low-interest incentives as it tries to recover from sales lost during the sudden-acceleration recall. Obviously, verify with your dealer that any 2010 Matrix you’re considering has the brake-override system as well as the modified gas pedal and replacement driver’s-side floormat fitted as part of the recall.

The 2011 Toyota Matrix ranks 6 out of 7 Affordable Compact Wagons. This ranking is based on analysis of 43 published reviews and test drives of the Toyota Matrix, and analysis of reliability and safety data.


The 2011 Toyota Matrix is fuel-efficient and utilitarian, but reviewers say it can’t top its competitors: Its performance is underwhelming, and it doesn’t offer nearly as much cargo space.

The automotive industry finds that 2011 Toyota Matrix is a hodgepodge of highs and lows. Let’s start with the good. The Matrix has some of the highest fuel economy ratings in its class, good cargo space, a comfortable interior and Smart Stop Technology. With a base model and a manual transmission, you can get 26/32 mpg city/highway, figures that are only topped by the Mini Cooper Clubman and Nissan Juke, both of which are too small for most shoppers. 


The Matrix also has a maximum cargo capacity of 49.4 cubic feet, which is plenty of space for hauling groceries or luggage. If you check out the Matrix’s interior, you should be satisfied with driver and passenger seating. The back seat is roomy, and there’s a standard tilt and telescopic steering wheel. Finally, Toyota added Smart Stop Technology, a system that reduces engine power when the brake pedal and accelerator are pressed at the same time, to the Matrix’s standard features list.

For these reasons, some journalists think the Toyota Matrix is a good choice. “Behold the Corolla wagon,” says Car and Driver. “Sharing its mechanicals with Toyota’s bestselling small car, the Matrix attracts with spacious and practical hatchback utility." However, after testing the Matrix’s sporty S trim and comparing the Matrix to its competitors, other test drivers think there are better affordable compact wagons on the market.


For example, reviewers find the base 1.8-liter engine is acceptable for daily commutes, but report that it’s underpowered compared to the Matrix’s sporty S model and the competition. If you upgrade to the S trim, you’ll still encounter a few problems. Performance is significantly better, but fuel economy plunges to 21/29 mpg city/highway with an automatic transmission. That’s down from 26/32 with the base engine and a manual transmission. Plus, the S model starts at about $21,400, which is expensive considering its decent but forgettable performance.

Even if you are satisfied with the performance upgrade, you may be disappointed with interior quality on either trim, which looks and feels inexpensive. Next is cargo space. The Matrix’s maximum cargo capacity is good, but when you compare the Matrix’s figures to its competitors, this wagon is easily bested by the Honda Fit, a hatchback, and the Hyundai Elantra Touring and Volkswagen Jetta SportWagen, all of which have more than 57 cubic feet with the rear seats folded.

When it comes down to it, the Matrix’s final grade looks pretty grim, and as a result, many reviewers aren’t impressed with this wagon’s complete package. “She's fun around town -- a good commuting car, really,” says Mother Proof . “But in the end, my hard, hard heart wasn't completely sold on the Matrix." But, if you are sold on the Matrix, don’t be discouraged. The Matrix will get you from point A to point B without hassle.

The Toyota Matrix gets a few changes for the 2011 model year. It has new wheels, two engines – down from three last year – standard Smart Stop Technology and an S model that features a 2.4-liter engine and 17-inch wheels. All-wheel drive is optional on the S trim. The base model has a 1.8-liter engine.

Compared to the rest of the class, as well as hatchbacks and compact SUVs, the Matrix is pricey. It starts at about $18,550 for the base model, and reaches about $21,400 for the sportier S model. At this rate you might as well start equipping a Honda Fit or Hyundai Elantra Touring with optional interior features or get a compact SUV.

Kate Middleton Engagement and wedding

Engagement and wedding
Main article: Wedding of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine Middleton
The newly married Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge on the balcony of Buckingham Palace.
Prince William and Catherine Middleton became engaged in October 2010 in Kenya, East Africa, during a 10-day trip to the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy to celebrate William passing his RAF helicopter search and rescue course. Clarence House announced the engagement on 16 November 2010. The couple married in Westminster Abbey on 29 April 2011, with the day declared a bank holiday in the United Kingdom. The wedding was watched by a global television audience of over two billion people.
Following international attention regarding the wedding, Lifetime aired a TV movie entitled William and Kate on 18 April 2011, in the US. Catherine was played by Camilla Luddington and William by Nico Evers-Swindell.TV programmes were also shown in the UK prior to the wedding which provided deeper insights into the couple's relationship and backgrounds, including When William Met Kate and Channel 4's Meet the Middletons.
Public appearances
Catherine was formally introduced to public life on 24 February 2011, two months before the wedding, when she and William attended a lifeboat naming ceremony in Trearddur, North Wales. On 16 February 2011, Clarence House announced that the Duke and Duchess' first royal tour of Canada
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton

kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton

kate middleton

Kate Middleton Engagement and wedding

Engagement and wedding
Main article: Wedding of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine Middleton
The newly married Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge on the balcony of Buckingham Palace.
Prince William and Catherine Middleton became engaged in October 2010 in Kenya, East Africa, during a 10-day trip to the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy to celebrate William passing his RAF helicopter search and rescue course. Clarence House announced the engagement on 16 November 2010. The couple married in Westminster Abbey on 29 April 2011, with the day declared a bank holiday in the United Kingdom. The wedding was watched by a global television audience of over two billion people.
Following international attention regarding the wedding, Lifetime aired a TV movie entitled William and Kate on 18 April 2011, in the US. Catherine was played by Camilla Luddington and William by Nico Evers-Swindell.TV programmes were also shown in the UK prior to the wedding which provided deeper insights into the couple's relationship and backgrounds, including When William Met Kate and Channel 4's Meet the Middletons.
Public appearances
Catherine was formally introduced to public life on 24 February 2011, two months before the wedding, when she and William attended a lifeboat naming ceremony in Trearddur, North Wales. On 16 February 2011, Clarence House announced that the Duke and Duchess' first royal tour of Canada
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton

kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton

kate middleton

Kate Middleton Engagement and wedding

Engagement and wedding
Main article: Wedding of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, and Catherine Middleton
The newly married Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge on the balcony of Buckingham Palace.
Prince William and Catherine Middleton became engaged in October 2010 in Kenya, East Africa, during a 10-day trip to the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy to celebrate William passing his RAF helicopter search and rescue course. Clarence House announced the engagement on 16 November 2010. The couple married in Westminster Abbey on 29 April 2011, with the day declared a bank holiday in the United Kingdom. The wedding was watched by a global television audience of over two billion people.
Following international attention regarding the wedding, Lifetime aired a TV movie entitled William and Kate on 18 April 2011, in the US. Catherine was played by Camilla Luddington and William by Nico Evers-Swindell.TV programmes were also shown in the UK prior to the wedding which provided deeper insights into the couple's relationship and backgrounds, including When William Met Kate and Channel 4's Meet the Middletons.
Public appearances
Catherine was formally introduced to public life on 24 February 2011, two months before the wedding, when she and William attended a lifeboat naming ceremony in Trearddur, North Wales. On 16 February 2011, Clarence House announced that the Duke and Duchess' first royal tour of Canada
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton

kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton
kate middleton

kate middleton

Permanent Hair Removal



What could be better than foregoing the razor or the hot wax, but still having silky smooth skin? No regrowth, no stubble and no oops, I forgot to shave! moments at the beach. Sounds good, doesn't it? Well, advances in permanent hair removal mean that the future is now you can have hair effectively and permanently removed!

There are two popular methods for permanent hair removal. Each method has its benefits, and one may be more suitable for you than the other.


Laser hair removal is a highly effective means of removing hair. Because of the way the laser is used, it can be tuned to each individual's skin type and tone, so the outcome is always the ideal one from person to person. This type of permanent hair removal is popular because of the rapidity of the treatment and the large area of hair that can be covered in each session. Where other treatments may need to be performed over a number of years, laser treatment tends to be done in several sessions over a few months, after which time the hair removal is said to be complete. Aside from slight, temporary patchiness in the skin, there is little risk in the procedure itself. The safety of the patient is fairly well assured, especially as laser hair removal is performed by a skilled medical practitioner. Patients are advised to stay out of the sun in the weeks before and after their treatment, as sun damage can cause the hair removal to be undone, but these are really the only precautions that need to be taken. Laser hair removal is available to most people interested in permanent hair removal. Its adaptability makes it suitable for almost all skin types, although at this stage it can not be used for removing very fair or white hair. Many people are interested in whether or not this type of permanent hair removal treatment is painful, as you would expect a laser entering your skin to be! Most patients feel nothing but a slight burning sensation, akin to being flicked with an elastic band, and do not require any kind of anesthesia. In the days immediately following the treatment, the skin may feel slightly sunburned. As far as permanent hair removal goes, laser treatment is highly effective and comparatively affordable. 


Electrolysis is a bit of a buzz word in the beauty industry. Many people hear about it and talk about it, without really knowing what it means. This method of permanent hair removal requires a great amount of skill to be performed correctly, but if it is, the results are excellent. Hair is removed using a very fine metal probe, which is inserted into the hair follicle, and does not penetrate the skin. Electricity is passed through the probe, which in turn damages the areas that generate and grow hair. Ta-da! The part of your epidermis that creates hair can do it no longer, allowing for permanent hair removal. Electrolysis has been performed at various levels for more than a century. It is proven in its effectiveness and studies suggest that as many as 93 per cent of patients are likely to experience excellent results. Although it is not as efficient as laser hair removal, it often requires less sessions. However, permanent hair removal of this kind can be expensive, and the nature of the procedure is that it is time consuming and not always useful for thick or plentiful hair. It is generally only used in small areas like the eyebrows or upper lip. These two methods are both highly effective for permanent hair removal. The choice of one procedure over the other should be based on several fairly straightforward factors:

Skin sensitivity electrolysis is more suitable for very sensitive skin
The area of hair to be removed laser treatment is better for larger areas
How much you hope to spend electrolysis is significantly more expensive than laser treatment 


There are do it yourself appliances available for permanent hair removal, but these usually involve plucking or tweezing hair. This is fairly ineffective and hair usually grows back within 6 weeks. It also increases the risk of ingrown hairs and infected or swollen pores, which are very unsightly! 


Permanent hair removal is excellent for ensuring that your skin always feels soft and smooth. As long as you make sure you choose the right option for you and seek the advice of a good medical practitioner, you should be happily throwing away your razors in no time!